Results tagged “Antarctica”

Lakes underneath the Antarctic ice sheet could be more hospitable than previously thought, allowing them to host more microbial life.

Far underneath the ice shelves of the Antarctic, there's more life than expected, finds a recent study in the journal Frontiers in Marine Science, published this week (15 February 2021).

UNSW Science Professor Rick Cavicchioli is an expert in microbes and why they are so important - just last year, he led an urgent call for the world to stop ignoring this 'unseen majority' in Earth's biodiversity and ecosystem when addressing climate change.

Perennially ice-covered lakes that host benthic microbial ecosystems are present in many regions of Antarctica. Lake Untersee is an ultra-oligotrophic lake that is substantially different from any other lakes on the continent as it does not develop a seasonal moat and therefore shares similarities to sub-glacial lakes where they are sealed to the atmosphere.

The discovery of the first active methane seep in Antarctica is providing scientists new understanding of the methane cycle and the role methane found in this region may play in warming the planet.

More than half of the planet's fresh water is in Antarctica. While most of it is frozen in the ice sheets, underneath the ice pools and streams of water flow into one another and into the Southern Ocean surrounding the continent.

Last night our weather shifted from sunny skies to low-cloud, light snow and light but gusty winds, our highest gust today being about 30 knots. The forecast is for more of the same so we must be prepared tonight for high winds that could descend upon us at most any time.

We have been keeping very busy these last couple of weeks, trying to take advantage of the nice weather (mostly calm and with clear skies more often than not).

We have had pretty good weather since we arrived at Untersee and have kept pretty busy getting the camp pulled together and starting up the science ops.

We spent the last several days getting the camp established and today the last tent (the Weatherport to be used at the field lab) was put in place.

Our traverse went well and we all made it to Lake Untersee safely.

We are almost ready to head to Lake Untersee, the traverse sleds are 90% packed and ready to go, we just have a few more details to attend to tomorrow.

After a very easy, uneventful flight south on the IL-76, we made it to the ice runway at Novolazarevskaya Tuesday afternoon.

We depart Cape Town in the IL-76 for Antarctica at 0900 local. We should be in Antarctica 6 hours later. Cheers, Dale

On Wednesday I hit the road and start making my way to Antarctica via Cape Town, South Africa. My team and I will arrive in Cape Town on Thursday, and weather and aircraft permitting, we will depart for the ice runway at Novolazarevskaya in Queen Maud Land on Tuesday the 29th.

Primitive ponds may have provided a suitable environment for brewing up Earth's first life forms, more so than oceans, a new MIT study finds.

"The camp at Lake Untersee is now closed, we pulled the last three tents down early yesterday morning and completed packing our cargo into the sea container with the remainder going onto the other two cargo sleds."

"The last week and a half has seen a lot of variability in the weather with katabatics visiting us frequently - this morning at 6am we had gusts hitting 50 knots."

"The last few days have been very nice with mild temperatures (-7°C to +2°C), sunshine and little wind."

"The hole melter was returned, but unfortunately it still does not work properly and we are unable to use it to make a dive hole or melt out the light sensors we left in the water column last year."

« Previous  1 2 3 4