Results tagged “Astrobiology”

The existence of intelligent, interstellar traveling and colonising life is a key assumption behind the Fermi Paradox.

Could there be another planet out there with a society at the same stage of technological advancement as ours?

Since its inception six decades ago, astrobiology has diversified immensely to encompass several scientific questions including the origin and evolution of Terran life, the organic chemical composition of extraterrestrial objects, and the concept of habitability, among others.

To advance the search for life in the universe, NASA should support research on a broader range of biosignatures and environments, and incorporate the field of astrobiology into all stages of future exploratory missions, says a new congressionally mandated report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.

Astrobiology, the study of the origin, evolution, distribution, and future of life in the universe, is a rapidly changing field, especially in the years since the publication of NASA's Astrobiology Strategy 2015. Recent scientific advances in the field now provide many opportunities to strengthen the role of astrobiology in NASA missions and to increase collaboration with other scientific fields and organizations. The report finds that these changes necessitate an updated science strategy for astrobiology.

Recently, many Earth-sized planets have been discovered around stars other than the Sun that might possess appropriate conditions for life.

Are we alone in the universe? Astrobiology, the study of the origins of life in the universe and the search for life on other worlds, is a highly interdisciplinary and rapidly changing field at the intersection of biology, chemistry, geology, planetary science, and physics.

Astrobiology, the study of the origin, evolution and future of life on Earth and beyond, is a multidisciplinary field that has expanded rapidly over the last two decades.

The John W. Kluge Center has opened the competition for the 2019 Baruch S. Blumberg NASA/Library of Congress Chair in Astrobiology

When you first take a biology class the focus is on memorizing vocabulary and basic principles. If you are really paying attention certain patterns and forms start to emerge from the tedium of rote memorization. A few more classes and the patterns start to reveal the rules that underly those patterns.

If you are also taking chemistry and physics and math then you're already familiar with the rules that govern matter and how to express them. Biology just takes a little more time to reveal itself. Add in some astronomy classes and talk of other worlds like our own and the origin of all of the elements of life being forged in the hearts of dying stars and you arrive at the core premise of "The Equations of Life: How Physics Shapes Evolution" by Charles Cockell.

If you're looking for a manual on the hunt for alien life, you're in luck.

A Multiverse - where our Universe is only one of many - might not be as inhospitable to life as previously thought, according to new research.

The third annual Breakthrough Discuss scientific conference, which will bring together leading astrobiologists, astronomers, engineers, and astrophysicists to advance discussion around recent discoveries of potential life in the Universe and novel ideas for space exploration, will be held on Thursday, April 12 and Friday, April 13, and full sessions will be available for live viewing on YouTube.

The two days of discussions will focus on "Alien Life: Diversity in the Universe," with sessions discussing the search for life in our solar system, possibilities for non-terrain life in the Universe, as well as progress in novel space propulsion. The conference will be live streamed on the Breakthrough Prize's YouTube page. Viewers are encouraged to participate virtually via a chat feature, which will be monitored by a facilitator who will feed questions into the panel discussion sessions.

Arizona State University's School of Earth and Space Exploration recently released new research on its flagship Smart Course, Habitable Worlds, published in the peer-reviewed journal, Astrobiology.

Developments in artificial intelligence may help us to predict the probability of life on other planets, according to new work by a team based at Plymouth University.

The selection of optimal targets in the search for life represents a highly important strategic issue. In this paper, we evaluate the relative benefits of searching for life around a potentially habitable planet orbiting a star of arbitrary mass relative to a Sun-like star.

Name: Jennifer Eigenbrode. Formal Job Classification: Research astrobiologist. Organization: Code 699, Planetary Environments Laboratory, Space Sciences Directorate

SETI is Part of Astrobiology

"Traditional SETI is not part of astrobiology" declares the NASA Astrobiology Strategy 2015 document. This is incorrect.

Astrobiology is a scientific discipline that studies life in the Universe. We call it a discipline and not a science because some authors have cast doubts over its epistemological status by calling it 'a science without an object of study'.

Was this the earliest TV mention of "astrobiology"? A scene from the original Star Trek episode "Return To Tomorrow" which first aired on 9 February 1968:

KIRK: "Who are you?"
MULHALL: "Doctor Ann Mulhall, Astrobiology"

Contrary to what NASA may want you to think, the word "Astrobiology" was used decades before NASA began using it to describe the study of extraterrestrial life.

This book "Astrobiology" - "Aстробиология" was published (in Russian) in 1953 in the USSR.

The photos below illustrate the topics that the book covered.

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