Results tagged “Europa”

Jupiter's Moons Could Be Warming Each Other

Jupiter's moons are hot. Well, hotter than they should be, for being so far from the Sun. In a process called tidal heating, gravitational tugs from Jupiter's moons and the planet itself stretch and squish the moons enough to warm them.

There is compelling evidence for subsurface water oceans among the three outer Galilean satellites, and evidence for an internal magma ocean in the innermost moon, Io. Tidal forces from Jupiter periodically deform these bodies, causing heating and deformation that, if measured, can probe their interior structures.

Regional Study of Europa's Photometry

The surface of Europa is geologically young and shows signs of current activity. Studying it from a photometric point of view gives us insight on its physical state.

A new model from NASA scientists supports the theory that the interior ocean in Jupiter's moon Europa would be able to sustain life.

The deep ocean (~100 km) of Europa, Jupiter's moon, is covered by a thick (tens of km) icy shell, and is one of the most probable places in the solar system to find extraterrestrial life. Yet, its ocean dynamics and its interaction with the ice cover have so far received little attention.

Jupiter's moon Europa is a fascinating world. On its surface, the moon appears to be scratched and scored with reddish-brown scars, which rake across the surface in a crisscrossing pattern.

The surface of Jupiter's moon Europa features a widely varied landscape, including ridges, bands, small rounded domes and disrupted spaces that geologists call "chaos terrain." Three newly reprocessed images, taken by NASA's Galileo spacecraft in the late 1990s, reveal details in diverse surface features on Europa.

Europa's surface reflectance exhibits a pronounced hemispheric dichotomy, which is hypothesized to form due to enhanced irradiation of the trailing hemisphere by energetic particles entrained in the jovian magnetosphere.

In the absence of direct observations of Europa's particle plumes, deposits left behind during eruptive events would provide the best evidence for recent geological activity, and would serve as indicators of the best places to search for ongoing activity on the icy moon.

A little robotic explorer will be rolling into Antarctica this month to perform a gymnastic feat -- driving upside down under sea ice.

Water Vapor Confirmed On Europa

Forty years ago, a Voyager spacecraft snapped the first closeup images of Europa, one of Jupiter's 79 moons. These revealed brownish cracks slicing the moon's icy surface, which give Europa the look of a veiny eyeball.

Hydrogen peroxide is part of an important radiolytic cycle on Europa and may be a critical source of oxidants to the putative subsurface ocean.

Table Salt Compound Spotted on Europa

A familiar ingredient has been hiding in plain sight on the surface of Jupiter's moon Europa.

WHY WE PERFORMED THIS AUDIT

Scientists believe that Europa, one of Jupiter's 79 known moons, may have a large liquid ocean below its icy surface suitable to sustain life.

Even though there are planned missions to explore Jupiter's moon Europa, they are unlikely to sample the depths of its potentially habitable ocean

During recent decades, data from space missions have provided strong evidence of deep liquid oceans underneath a thin outer icy crust on several moons of Jupiter, particularly Europa.

ALMA Maps The Temperature of Europa

Jupiter's icy moon Europa has a chaotic surface terrain that is fractured and cracked, suggesting a long-standing history of geologic activity.

The surface of Europa contains many quasi-circular morphologies called lenticulae. Although the formation mechanism of lenticulae is not understood, sill intrusion from the subsurface ocean is one promising hypothesis.

ALMA Thermal Observations of Europa

We present four daytime thermal images of Europa taken with the Atacama Large Millimeter Array. Together, these images comprise the first spatially resolved thermal dataset with complete coverage of Europa's surface.

New comprehensive mapping of the radiation pummeling Jupiter's icy moon Europa reveals where scientists should look -- and how deep they'll have to go -- when searching for signs of habitability and biosignatures.

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