Results tagged “Space biology”

NASA announces the award of 10 grants or cooperative agreements for exciting new Space Biology research that will advance NASA's understanding of how living systems respond, acclimate, and adapt to the space environment in support of human space exploration.

Plants will be a major component of advanced life support systems to enable deep space exploration that will take humans to the moon, Mars and beyond.

Understanding which genes are expressed in biological cells is key to understanding how biological organisms respond and adapt to the stresses of spaceflight.

Spaceflight is known to disrupt the immune system in astronauts. Previous research has also shown immune dysregulation in humans subjected to isolation on Earth.

The plant biology experiments of two NC State researchers are back on Earth after spending weeks at the International Space Station.

The National Academy of Sciences Decadal Survey on Biological and Physical Sciences Research in Space 2023-2032 will review the state of knowledge in the current and emerging areas of space-related biological and physical sciences research and generate consensus recommendations for a comprehensive vision and strategy for a decade of transformative science at the frontiers of biological and physical sciences research in space.

Researchers from NASA's Kennedy Space Center planted pepper seeds in seed carriers inside the Space Life Sciences Lab on April 8, 2021, as part of the Plant Habitat-04 (PH-04) experiment.

Microbiologists at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory are preparing experimental samples of fungi to send for a ride around the moon tentatively scheduled for later in 2021 or early 2022.

Extra Dwarf Pak Choi plants are pictured growing inside the Veggie space botany research facility aboard the International Space Station. The Veg-03 investigation is exploring how to grow food in space and assesses the impact of space gardening on crew morale and mood.

When scientists complete an experiment aboard the International Space Station, the ramifications of that work have just begun. NASA carries on a legacy of decades of biological research data, fueling new discoveries long after studies wrap up in space.

On Nov. 30, 2020, NASA astronaut Kate Rubins harvested radish plants growing in the Advanced Plant Habitat (APH) aboard the International Space Station. She meticulously collected and wrapped in foil each of the 20 radish plants, placing them in cold storage for the return trip to Earth in 2021 on SpaceX's 22nd Commercial Resupply Services mission.

Living in space isn't easy. There are notable impacts on the biology of living things in the harsh environment of space.

Radish plants are pictured growing inside the Columbus laboratory module's Plant Habitat-02. NASA Astronaut Kate Rubins harvested leaves from the plants for the space botany experiment that is exploring the capability for food production in microgravity.

What biology research would you conduct on the International Space Station? As the world celebrates 20 years of astronauts living and working on the International Space Station, ESA is preparing for another decade of European research in humankind's weightless laboratory.

Eight saplings grown from pips taken from Isaac Newton's apple tree and flown in space by ESA astronaut Tim Peake are being planted across the UK and Europe.

A team of researchers led by Professor Ikawa Masahito from the Research Institute for Microbial Diseases of Osaka University, in a joint research project with the University of Tsukuba and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, raised 12 male mice in the Japanese Experiment Module "Kibo" on the International Space Station for 35 days.

NASA has awarded 15 grants for new space biology research designed to help the agency achieve its goals under the Artemis lunar exploration program.

In space, the human body loses muscle mass. Although living in microgravity requires no heavy lifting, this loss of muscle reduces physical performance.

NASA and the Russian Institute of Biomedical Problems, Moscow, are collaborating on a space biology mission aboard an unmanned Russian biosatellite to understand better the mechanisms of how life adapts to microgravity and then readapts to gravity on Earth. NASA will participate in the post-flight analysis of rodents flown for 30 days on the biosatellite, Bion-M1, which launched April 19 from Baikonur, Kazakhstan.

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