Results tagged “Titan”

Seismology is the main tool for inferring the deep interior structures of Earth and potentially also of other planetary bodies in the solar system.

Saturn's largest moon, Titan, is a hotbed of organic molecules, harboring a soup of complex hydrocarbons similar to that thought to have existed over four billion years ago on the primordial Earth.

The dynamic quadrupole Love number of Titan measured by Cassini is k2,obs=0.616±0.067, strongly indicating a global subsurface ocean.

Titan, Saturn's largest moon, has a dense atmosphere, together with lakes and seas of liquid hydrocarbons.

Ice Feature Found On Titan

Rain, seas and a surface of eroding organic material can be found both on Earth and on Saturn's largest moon, Titan. However, on Titan it is methane, not water, that fills the lakes with slushy raindrops.

Titan's abundant lakes and seas exchange methane vapor and energy with the atmosphere via a process generally known as air-sea interaction.

Volatile organic molecules formed by photochemistry in the upper atmosphere of Titan can undergo condensation as pure ices in the stratosphere and the troposphere as well as condense as ice layers onto the organic aerosols that are visible as the haze layers of Titan.

An Intense Thermospheric Jet on Titan

Winds in Titan's lower and middle atmosphere have been determined by a variety of techniques.

The Cassini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS) Electron Spectrometer (ELS) instrument onboard Cassini revealed an unexpected abundance of negative ions above 950 km in Titan's ionosphere.

The Cassini mission offered us the opportunity to monitor the seasonal evolution of Titan's atmosphere from 2004 to 2017, i.e. half a Titan year.

An image from the international Cassini spacecraft provides evidence of rainfall on the north pole of Titan, the largest of Saturn's moons. The rainfall would be the first indication of the start of a summer season in the moon's northern hemisphere.

We apply previously introduced measures of chemical disequilibrium to Cassini mass spectroscopy data on the atmosphere of Titan.

A team including Berkeley Lab scientists homes in on a 'missing link' in Titan's one-of-a-kind chemistry.

We investigate the thermal equation of state, bulk modulus, thermal expansion coefficient, and heat capacity of MH-III (CH4 filled-ice Ih), needed for the study of CH4 transport and outgassing for the case of Titan and super-Titans.

The Cassini/Huygens mission provided new insights on the chemistry of the upper atmosphere of Titan.

Formation of organic aerosols driven by photochemical reactions has been observed and suggested in CH4-containing atmospheres, including Titan and early Earth.

NASA researchers have confirmed the existence in Titan's atmosphere of vinyl cyanide, which is an organic compound that could potentially provide the cellular membranes for microbial life to form in Titan's vast methane oceans.

Saturn's moon Titan may be nearly a billion miles away from Earth, but a recently published paper based on data from NASA's Cassini spacecraft reveals a new way this distant world and our own are eerily similar.

With the discovery of ever smaller and colder exoplanets, terrestrial worlds with hazy atmospheres must be increasingly considered.

During the accretion of Titan, impact heating may have been sufficient to allow the global melting of water ice and the release of volatile compounds, mainly constituted of CO2, CH4 and NH3.

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