Results tagged “astrobiology”

The Astrobiology Science Conference (AbSciCon) is a community-organized conference that provides a forum for reporting on new discoveries, sharing data and insights, advancing collaborative efforts and initiating new ones, planning new projects, and educating the next generation of astrobiologists.

Research shows that a new telescope could detect a potential signature of life on other planets in as little as 60 hours.

In Kevin Hand's "Alien Oceans: The Search For Life In The Depths Of Space" we learn that Earth is just one example of a myriad ways that a world can have an ocean. And searching for life on other ocean worlds requires a combination of old tools and new approaches to using those tools.

We live on an ocean world with 71% its surface covered by a water. For all of history humans had an intrinsic bias that all inhabited worlds would have large oceans - since we do. Indeed, the large flat plains of our Moon still bear names of imaginary seas based on that bias and early telescopes. That said we held to the notion that life would arise on a world if only it had Earth's basic characteristics - one of which was large bodies of water. Well, we now know that there is more than one way to have a planet with lots of liquid water.

If we find life on the Red Planet, we'll have astrobiologists like Dr. Kennda Lynch to thank.

The huge forces generated by the Z machine at Sandia National Laboratories are being used to replicate the gravitational pressures on so-called "super-Earths" to determine which might maintain atmospheres that could support life.

The capacity to sense gradients efficiently and acquire information about the ambient environment confers many advantages like facilitating movement toward nutrient sources or away from toxic chemicals.

A device developed by scientists at the CY Cergy Paris University and Paris Observatory promises insight into how the building blocks of life form in outer space.

NASA Letter To The Astrobiology Community

Dear Colleagues, For all of us, for many reasons, 2020 has been a tough year and its impacts will be felt in many ways in 2021 and beyond. I am writing to inform you of some changes planned for the Astrobiology Program in Fiscal Year 2021 to meet the continuing challenges.

The NASA Astrobiology Program announces the selection of eight new interdisciplinary research teams today, inaugurating its Interdisciplinary Consortia for Astrobiology Research (ICAR) program.

Due to unfavorable launch conditions, AbSciCon 2021 is scrubbed but is A GO for 2022. The Astrobiology Science Conference (AbSciCon) brings the astrobiology community together every two years to share research, collaborate, and plan for the future. The conference will now be held 15-20 May 2022 and will remain in Atlanta, GA, USA, at the Hilton Atlanta.

Although Earth is uniquely situated in the solar system to support creatures that call it home, different forms of life could have once existed, or might still exist, on other planets. But finding traces of past or current lifeforms on other worlds is challenging.

Imagine microscopic life-forms, such as bacteria, transported through space, and landing on another planet. The bacteria finding suitable conditions for its survival could then start multiplying again, sparking life at the other side of the universe.

The growth time scales of planetary embryos and their formation process are imperative for our understanding on how planetary systems form and develop.

Keith's note: I have known John Rummel for 35 years. I first worked with him at the old Life Science Division at NASA Headquarters. He has made an indelible mark on NASA's search for life in the universe. Please consider making a donation to help out John and his family in this time of need.

Researchers have found that rocky exoplanets which formed early in the life of the galaxy seem to have had a greater chance of developing a magnetic field and plate tectonics than planets which formed later.

Humans have been wondering whether we alone in the universe since antiquity.

Giant elliptical galaxies are not as likely as previously thought to be cradles of technological civilizations such as our own, according to a recent paper by a University of Arkansas astrophysicist.

Astrobiology has been gaining increasing scientific prominence and public attention as the search for life beyond Earth continues to make significant headway on multiple fronts. In view of these recent developments, the fascinating and dynamic etymology of astrobiology is elucidated, and thus shown to encompass a plethora of vivid characters drawn from different continents, religions, ideologies and centuries.

Aims. Formamide (HCONH2) is the simplest molecule containing the peptide bond first detected in the gas phase in Orion-KL and SgrB2. In recent years, it has been observed in high temperature regions such as hot corinos, where thermal desorption is responsible for the sublimation of frozen mantles into the gas phase.

The NASA Science Mission Directorate is soliciting community feedback and recommendations on the structure and science goals of the NASA Astrobiology Program's Research Coordination Network (RCN) focused on "Early Cells to Multicellularity" (ECM) research. Responses to this Request for Information (RFI) will be used by NASA to further inform planning and development of the ECM RCN and to ensure that this RCN is scoped to advance the big science questions in this research area.

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