Results tagged “evolution”

Life In Evolution's Fast Lane

Most living things have a suite of genes dedicated to repairing their DNA, limiting the rate at which their genomes change through time.

Extreme fluctuations in atmospheric oxygen levels corresponded with evolutionary surges and extinctions in animal biodiversity during the Cambrian explosion, finds new study led by UCL and the University of Leeds.

arth's first complex animals were an eclectic bunch that lived in the shallow oceans between 580-540 million years ago.

Multicellularity--the integration of previously autonomous cells into a new, more complex organism--is one of the major transitions in evolution.

Newly discovered fossil evidence from Namibia strengthens the proposition that the world's first mass extinction was caused by "ecosystem engineers" - newly evolved biological organisms that altered the environment so radically it drove older species to extinction.

Early life forms on Earth are likely to have mutated and evolved at much higher rates than they do today, suggests a new analysis from researchers at the University of North Carolina.

Life on Earth often depends on symbiotic relationships between microbes and other forms of life.

Parts of the primordial soup in which life arose have been maintained in our cells today according to scientists at the University of East Anglia.

Organisms have increased in complexity through a series of major evolutionary transitions, in which formerly autonomous entities become parts of a novel higher-level entity.

How did Multicellularity Evolve?

The evolutionary path from unicellular life to multicellularity is varied, but all lead to complex organisms

Evolution can Select for Evolvability

Evolution does not operate with a goal in mind; it does not have foresight. But organisms that have a greater capacity to evolve may fare better in rapidly changing environments. This raises the question: does evolution favor characteristics that increase a species' ability to evolve?

Untangling The Tree of Life on Earth

Two recent high-profile phylogenetic studies reached conflicting conclusions about whether snail's closest relatives are bivalves or an enigmatic group called tusk shells. Vanderbilt phylogeneticists suggest that the cause of this conflict is that the three groups diverged rapidly a long time ago. Credit: Antonis Rokas, Vanderbilt University

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