Results tagged “Comet ISON”

The Life of Comet ISON

After several days of continued observations, scientists continue to work to determine and to understand the fate of Comet ISON.

Comet ISON May or May Not Still Exist

Comet ISON went around the sun on Nov. 28, 2013. Several solar observatories watched the comet throughout this closest approach to the sun, known as perihelion.

Comet ISON approaches the Sun

SOHO image showing comet ISON approaching the Sun. ISON makes its closest approach on 28 November, when it will pass at a distance of 1.2 million kilometres above the Sun's visible surface. SOHO's instruments are expected to have a view of the comet as it passes through their fields-of-view.

One or more fragments may have detached from comet ISON in the past days, as two wing-shaped features in the comet's atmosphere suggest.

A new image of the Sunward plunging Comet ISON suggests that the comet is intact despite some predictions that the fragile icy nucleus might disintegrate as the Sun warms it. The comet will pass closest to the Sun on November 28.

First HiRISE Images of Comet ISON

On 29 September 2013, the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) maneuvered to point its High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera at ISON, a new comet passing by Mars on its way into the inner Solar System.

Comet ISON is still more than two months away from its spectacular close encounter with the sun. Already, the brightening comet has become a good target for backyard telescopes in the pre-dawn sky.

Will Comet ISON Break Up?

Comet ISON is an interesting comet in many ways, but we know it won't hit us. There is speculation among astronomers however, that it could break up into pieces.

Approaching the sun, Comet ISON floats against a seemingly infinite backdrop of numerous galaxies and a handful of foreground stars.

Astronomers using NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope have observed what most likely are strong carbon dioxide emissions from Comet ISON ahead of its anticipated pass through the inner solar system later this year.

Planetary astronomers and Host Tony Darnell hosted a Google Hangout discussion of Comet ISON, its origins and destination, and why everyone's so excited about it.

What is a Sungrazing Comet?

Sungrazing comets are a special class of comets that come very close to the sun at their nearest approach, a point called perihelion. To be considered a sungrazer, a comet needs to get within about 850,000 miles from the sun at perihelion. Many come even closer, even to within a few thousand miles.

This July Fourth, the solar system is showing off some fireworks of its own. Superficially resembling a skyrocket, comet ISON is hurtling toward the sun presently at a whopping 48,000 mph.

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