Results tagged “DSCOVR”

Typhoon Bavi is a large storm moving through the Yellow Sea. A NASA camera captured an image of the Northwestern Pacific Ocean that showed Bavi headed north.

Situated about 1.6 million kilometers (1 million miles) from Earth toward the Sun, NOAA's Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) maintains a constant view of the sunlit face of our planet.

From a dusty atmosphere stretching across the Atlantic Ocean to daily views of clouds at sunrise, a new NASA camera keeping a steady eye on the sunlit side of Earth is yielding new insights about our changing planet.

Earth As Seen By DSCOVR From L1

This DSCOVR image of Earth was taken on 29 November 2015 at 07:25:15 GMT from a distance of 861,489 miles at L1.

NASA launched a new website Monday so the world can see images of the full, sunlit side of the Earth every day.

A NASA camera aboard the Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) satellite captured a unique view of the moon as it moved in front of the sunlit side of Earth last month.

DSCOVR Reaches Final Orbit

More than 100 days after it launched, NOAA's Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) satellite has reached its orbit position about one million miles from Earth.

DSCOVR Launched

The SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket carrying NOAA's Deep Space Climate Observatory spacecraft, or DSCOVR, lifts off from Space Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida.

NASA Television coverage of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) mission news briefing on Feb. 7 2015 from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

DSCOVR Is Finally Poised for Liftoff

With the launch of the Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) satellite mission in early 2015, the United States will extend its ability to give accurate warnings of solar activity that could potentially wreak havoc throughout society and the economy on Earth.

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