Results tagged “Dark Matter”

Dark matter, which researchers believe make up about 80% of the universe's mass, is one of the most elusive mysteries in modern physics.

Dark matter may scatter against each other only when they hit the right energy, say researchers in Japan, Germany, and Austria in a new study. Their idea helps explain why galaxies from the smallest to the biggest have the shapes they do.

Dark Matter on the Move

Scientists have found evidence that dark matter can be heated up and moved around, as a result of star formation in galaxies.

Is dark matter a source of a yet unknown force in addition to gravity? The mysterious dark matter is little understood and trying to understand its properties is an important challenge in modern physics and astrophysics.

Dark matter is increasingly puzzling. Around the world, physicists have been trying for decades to determine the nature of these matter particles, which do not emit light and are therefore invisible to the human eye.

Only a small part of the universe consists of visible matter. By far the largest part is invisible and consists of dark matter and dark energy.

Dark Matter is Likely Cold, Not Fuzzy

Dark matter is the aptly named unseen material that makes up the bulk of matter in our universe. But what dark matter is made of is a matter of debate.

Axions are particles whose hypothetical existence was introduced in 1977 by Roberto Peccei and Helen Quinn.

A mysterious gamma-ray glow at the center of the Milky Way is most likely caused by pulsars -- the incredibly dense, rapidly spinning cores of collapsed ancient stars that were up to 30 times more massive than the sun.

New Insight Into Dark Matter Halos

In the 1970s, scientists noticed something strange about the motion of galaxies. All the matter at the edge of spiral galaxies was rotating just as fast as material in the inner part of the galaxy.

Researchers at the University of Waterloo have been able to capture the first composite image of a dark matter bridge that connects galaxies together.

Researchers have detected two massive holes which have been 'punched' through a stream of stars just outside the Milky Way, and found that they were likely caused by clumps of dark matter, the invisible substance which holds galaxies together and makes up a quarter of all matter and energy in the universe.

Dark matter is a mysterious substance composing most of the material universe, now widely thought to be some form of massive exotic particle.

A trio of brightly pulsating stars at the outskirts of the Milky Way is racing away from the galaxy and may confirm a method for detecting dwarf galaxies dominated by dark matter and explain ripples in the outer disk of the galaxy.

A new study publishing this week in the Astrophysical Journal by Gary Przeau of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory proposes the existence of long filaments of dark matter, or "hairs."

A new space telescope will soon peer into the darkness of 'near space' (within a few thousand light years of Earth) to seek answers related to the field of high-energy astrophysics

Besides the atoms that make up our bodies and all of the objects we encounter in everyday life, the universe also contains mysterious dark matter and dark energy.

A newly discovered dwarf galaxy orbiting our own Milky Way has offered up a surprise -- it appears to be radiating gamma rays, according to an analysis by physicists at Carnegie Mellon, Brown, and Cambridge universities.

A ripple in the outskirts of the Milky Way -- and a hunch -- led Rochester Institute of Technology astrophysicist Sukanya Chakrabarti to a previously undetected dwarf galaxy hidden under a veil of dark matter.

Researchers from the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, the University of Tokyo and other institutions have begun a wide-area survey of the distribution of dark matter in the universe using Hyper Suprime-Cam, a new wide-field camera installed on the Subaru Telescope in Hawai'i.

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