Results tagged “NOAA”

First Images From GOES-16

Since the GOES-16 satellite lifted off from Cape Canaveral on November 19, scientists, meteorologists and ordinary weather enthusiasts have anxiously waited for the first photos from NOAA's newest weather satellite, GOES-16, formerly GOES-R.

NASA successfully launched for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) the first in a series of highly advanced geostationary weather satellites Saturday from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida.

During a news briefing on Nov. 17, officials from NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), previewed the mission of GOES-R, the first spacecraft in a new series of NASA-built advanced geostationary weather satellites.

The geomagnetic storming watch for 30 December has been upgraded to a G3 (Strong), with a G1 (Minor) storming watch still in effect for 31 December.

This image was taken by the JMA Himawari satellite at 1840Z on September 2, 2015.

Another large snowstorm affecting New England was dropping more snow on the region and breaking records on February 9, as NOAA's GOES-East satellite captured an image of the clouds associated with the storm system.

NASA Television coverage of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) mission news briefing on Feb. 7 2015 from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

Blizzard Aftermath Seen From Space

As the storm moves offshore and the skies clear over the Northeast United States, the extent of snowfall from the blizzard is shown in this image from the Suomi NPP satellite imagery, taken on January 28, 2015 at 1:50 EST.

The year 2014 ranks as Earth's warmest since 1880, according to two separate analyses by NASA and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) scientists.

Severe Holiday Weather Seen from Space

Severe weather in the form of tornadoes is not something people expect on Christmas week but a storm system on Dec. 23 brought tornadoes to Mississippi, Georgia and Louisiana.

A cold front sweeping deep into the Southern U.S. is bringing freezing temperatures to large parts of the country.

NOAA and NASA are funding three demonstration projects that will lay the foundation for the first national network to monitor marine biodiversity at scales ranging from microbes to whales.

This full-disk image from NOAA's GOES-13 satellite was captured at 11:45 UTC (7:45 a.m. EDT) and shows the Americas on March 20, 2014. This date marks the start of astronomical spring in the northern hemisphere.

NOAA Ovation Aurora Model Goes Operational

The aurora is highly correlated with a number of space weather impacts on systems making forecasting the location and intensity of the aurora important.

Monster Snow Storm As Seen From Space

The monster winter storm that brought icing to the U.S. southeast moved northward along the Eastern Seaboard and brought snow, sleet and rain from the Mid-Atlantic to New England on February 13.

A new NASA video of NOAA's GOES satellite imagery shows three days of movement of the massive winter storm that stretches from the southern U.S. to the northeast.

Clouds associated with the major winter storm that is bringing wintry precipitation and chilly temperatures to the U.S. south is the focus in an image from NOAA's GOES-East satellite today, February 12 at 1310 UTC/ 8:10 EST.

NOAA's GOES-East satellite is providing continuous coverage of the major winter storm affecting the U.S. East Coast on January 21, 2014.

This image taken on January 3, 2014 by the Suomi NPP satellite.

Two low pressure systems converged over the Mid-Atlantic Region Thursday resulting in heavy snowfall potential and dangerously cold temperatures from the Midwest through the central Appalachians and into New England into Friday.

« Previous  1 2 3