Results tagged “Orion”

After four months of rigorous testing in the world's premier space environments simulation facility at NASA's Plum Brook Station, the Orion spacecraft for the Artemis I mission is certified and another step toward being ready for flight.

Orion Recovery Practice

NASA's Landing and Recovery team, composed of members from the Department of Defense, NASA and contractor Jacobs, practiced securing a test version of Orion into the well deck of a ship.

The Orion crew and service module stack for Artemis I was lifted out of the Final Assembly and Test (FAST) cell on Monday, November 11.

NASA is setting in motion the Orion spacecraft production line to support as many as 12 Artemis missions, including the mission that will carry the first woman and next man to the Moon by 2024.

NASA is building a system to send astronauts to the Moon for Artemis missions, and that includes tests to make sure the Orion spacecraft is prepared to safely carry crew on an alternate mission profile in the face of unexpected problems.

Preparing For Ascent Abort-2

The test version of Orion attached to the Launch Abort System for the Ascent Abort-2 (AA-2) flight test is moved by crane into the vertical integration facility at Space Launch Complex 46 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida on May 23, 2019.

Airbus will deliver the first European Service Module (ESM) for NASA's Orion spacecraft from its aerospace site in Bremen, Germany on 5 November 2018.

NASA is inviting media to its Kennedy Space Center in Florida at 9 a.m. EST Friday, Nov. 16, for an event marking the arrival from Bremen, Germany, of the European Service Module - the powerhouse that will supply NASA's Orion spacecraft with electricity, propulsion, thermal control, air and water.

NASA Completes Orion Parachute Tests

NASA has completed the final test to qualify Orion's parachute system for flights with astronauts, checking off an important milestone on the path to send humans on missions to the Moon and beyond.

The structure for Europe's second service module for NASA's Orion spacecraft arrived at the Airbus clean room in Bremen, Germany, last week.

Heat shield back shell panels are prefitted on the Orion spacecraft at NASA's Kennedy Space Center.

NASA's new deep space exploration systems will send crew 40,000 miles beyond the Moon, and return them safely home.

NASA's Orion spacecraft is scheduled to undergo a design test in April 2019 of the capsule's launch abort system (LAS).

Orion System Tests Underway

To ensure everything performs as planned, the Orion spacecraft destined for Exploration Mission-1 was successfully powered up for the first time this week in the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout Facility at NASA Kennedy Space Center.

At the Promontory, Utah, facility of Orion subcontractor Orbital ATK, engineers tested the abort motor for Orion's launch abort system June 15, firing the 17-foot tall motor for five seconds.

In a lab at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston, engineers simulated conditions that astronauts in space suits would experience when the Orion spacecraft is vibrating during launch atop the agency's powerful Space Launch System rocket.

Orion Module Recovery Testing

U.S. Navy divers and other personnel in a rigid hull Zodiac boat have attached tether lines to a test version of the Orion crew module.

NASA successfully kicked off a series of tests Sept. 30 to qualify Orion's parachute system for flights with astronauts, a milestone that will help the agency safely return crew to Earth from deep-space missions.

When astronauts in Orion venture far beyond Earth into deep space, they will expand humanity's frontier and push the boundaries of exploration.

Inside the high bay in the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, the protective coverings were removed from the Orion heat shield for Exploration Mission 1 (EM-1).

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