Results tagged “Phobos”

For the first time, NASA's Mars Odyssey orbiter has caught the Martian moon Phobos during a full moon phase.

Phobos Got Its Grooves from Rolling Stones

A new study bolsters the idea that strange grooves crisscrossing the surface of the Martian moon Phobos were made by rolling boulders blasted free from an ancient asteroid impact.

NASA's longest-lived mission to Mars has gained its first look at the Martian moon Phobos, pursuing a deeper understanding by examining it in infrared wavelengths.

Phobos Photobombs Mars

A football-shaped object just 16.5 miles by 13.5 miles by 11 miles, Phobos is one of the smallest moons in the solar system.

The ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter has imaged the martian moon Phobos as part of a second set of test science measurements made since it arrived at the Red Planet on 19 October.

Some of the mysterious grooves on the surface of Mars' moon Phobos are the result of debris ejected by impacts eventually falling back onto the surface to form linear chains of craters, according to a new study.

International collaboration finds that two small satellites (Phobos and Deimos) orbiting Mars can also be formed by a giant impact like the origin of our Moon. The research is reported in Nature Geoscience, July 2016.

NASA scientists are closer to solving the mystery of how Mars' moon Phobos formed.

Phobos is Slowly Falling Apart

The long, shallow grooves lining the surface of Phobos are likely early signs of the structural failure that will ultimately destroy this moon of Mars.

Now available is the July 8 , 2015 NASA Future In-Space Operations (FISO) telecon material. The speaker was Michael Gernhardt (NASA JSC) who discussed "Human Exploration of Phobos".

This image of Phobos transiting Mars was taken by the Mars Colour Camera on 14 February 2015.

Phobos Occults Mars

Mars' moon Phobos has already been extensively observed - this image is just one example, taken in 2009 - so its occultation of Mars Express on 28 April 2014 is not expected to yield dramatic discoveries.

Late this month, ESA's Mars Express will make the closest flyby yet of the Red Planet's largest moon Phobos, skimming past at only 45 km above its surface.

The study helps to confirm the idea that the surface of Phobos contains tons of dust, soil, and rock blown off the Martian surface by large projectile impacts.

A Solar Eclipse Seen from Mars

Images taken with a telephoto-lens camera on NASA's Mars rover Curiosity catch the larger of Mars' two moons, Phobos, passing directly in front of the sun -- the sharpest images of a solar eclipse ever taken at Mars.

The larger of the two moons of Mars, Phobos, passes directly in front of the other, Deimos, in a new series of sky-watching images from NASA's Mars rover Curiosity.

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is soliciting the submission of multiinstitutional team-based proposals for research as participating members of the Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute (SSERVI), hereafter referred to as "the Institute."

Phobos in 3D

Some 135 years after its discovery, Mars' largest moon Phobos is seen in fantastic detail - and in 3D - in an image taken by ESA's Mars Express spacecraft as it passed just 100 km by.

Phobos As Seen By Mars Express

This picture of Phobos near the limb of Mars was captured in 2010 by Mars Express currently orbiting Mars. Phobos is a heavily cratered and barren moon, with its largest crater located on the far side.

The following article is a free sample from the current issue of Space Quarterly Magazine. It is our hope that if you enjoy this article you will consider subscribing to the magazine.

« Previous  1 2