Results tagged “Venus”

During a brief swing by Venus, NASA's Parker Solar Probe detected a natural radio signal that revealed the spacecraft had flown through the planet's upper atmosphere.

How Long Is A Day On Venus?

Venus is an enigma. It's the planet next door and yet reveals little about itself.

Fundamental properties of the planet Venus, such as its internal mass distribution and variations in length of day, have remained unknown.

NASA's Parker Solar Probe captured stunning views of Venus during its close flyby of the planet in July 2020.

At some point between 300 million and 1 billion years ago, a large cosmic object smashed into the planet Venus, leaving a crater more than 170 miles in diameter.

A trio of papers provide new insight into the composition and evolution of the surface of Venus, hidden beneath its caustic, high temperature atmosphere. Utilizing imaging from orbit using multiple wavelengths - six-band spectroscopy proposed as part of the VERITAS and EnVision missions - scientists can map the iron content of the Venusian surface and construct the first-ever geologic map.

An international team of researchers has found that some of the oldest terrain on Venus, known as tesserae, have layering that seems consistent with volcanic activity. The finding could provide insights into the enigmatic planet's geological history.

Volcanoes On Venus Are Still Active

A new study identified 37 recently active volcanic structures on Venus. The study provides some of the best evidence yet that Venus is still a geologically active planet.

Imagine Earth. Now fill the skies with thick, Sun-obscuring clouds of sulfuric acid; boil off the oceans by cranking up the temperature to 900 degrees Fahrenheit (nearly 500 degrees Celsius), and boost the air pressure high enough to flatten you like a pancake.

As it sped away from Venus, NASA's Mariner 10 spacecraft captured this seemingly peaceful view of a planet the size of Earth, wrapped in a dense, global cloud layer.

Planetary-scale waves are thought to play a role in powering the yet-unexplained atmospheric superrotation of Venus.

Images from the Akatsuki spacecraft unveil what keeps Venus's atmosphere rotating much faster than the planet itself.

New research led by Universities Space Research Association (USRA) and published today in Science Advances shows that lava flows on Venus may be only a few years old, suggesting that Venus could be volcanically active today -- making it the only planet in our solar system, other than Earth, with recent eruptions.

Now superheated by greenhouse gases, Venus' climate was once more similar to Earth's, with a shallow ocean's worth of water. It may even have subduction zones like Earth, areas where the planet's crust sinks back into rock closer to the core of the planet.

A Japanese research group has identified a giant streak structure among the clouds covering planet Venus based on observation from the spacecraft Akatsuki.

Venus's Mysterious Night Side Revealed

The study shows that atmosphere on Venus' night side behaves very differently to that on the side of the planet facing the Sun (the 'dayside').

Venus's Turbulent Atmosphere

Venus is often referred to as Earth's twin because both planets share a similar size and sur-face composition. Also, they both have atmospheres with complex weather systems.

Bromine species, and hydrogen bromide (HBr) in particular, could play an important part in the photochemistry of the lower atmosphere of Venus.

This document is the EnVision Venus orbiter proposal, submitted in October 2016 in response to ESA's M5 call for Medium-size missions for its Science Programme, for launch in 2029.

A team of scientists at NASA's Glenn Research Center in Cleveland recently completed a technology demonstration that could enable new scientific missions to the surface of Venus.

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