Results tagged “coronal mass ejection”

Two years ago, an intense solar storm, a coronal mass ejection (CME) from the Sun, narrowly missed Earth. If it had hit, researchers say, we could still be picking up the pieces.

A giant cloud of solar particles, called a coronal mass ejection, explodes off the sun on Jan. 7, 2014

A cloud of particles known as a coronal mass ejection, or CME, can be seen bursting up and to the right off the sun (obscured by the center disk) in this image. CMEs are a solar phenomenon that can send billions of tons of particles into space.

A Fiery Solar Explosion - The Sun as Art

Like a dragon breathing fire, a powerful blast of plasma erupts from the Sun in this colourised view of a 'coronal mass ejection'.

On August 20, 2013 at 4:24 am EDT, the sun erupted with an Earth-directed coronal mass ejection or CME, a solar phenomenon which can send billions of tons of particles into space that can reach Earth one to three days later.

On July 22, 2013, at 2:24 a.m. EDT, the sun erupted with a coronal mass ejection or CME, a solar phenomenon that can send billions of tons of solar particles into space that can affect electronic systems in satellites.

Side-by-Side Solar Eruptions

Two coronal mass ejections (CMEs) expand side-by-side from the Sun and out into space in this movie, playing out in front of the ESA/NASA Solar and Heliospheric Observatory, SOHO, on 1-2 July 2013.

The Space Foundation has announced the winners of its 2012 Space Foundation Student Art Contest co-sponsored by ARES Corporation and Fisher Space Pen Co. The 36 winners came from seven states and the country of Pakistan.

A potent follow-up solar flare, just days after the Sun launched the biggest coronal mass ejection (CME) seen in nearly a decade, delivered a powerful radiation punch to Earth's magnetic field despite the fact that it was aimed away from our planet.

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