Results tagged “cosmology”

A Fossil From The Big Bang

A relic cloud of gas, orphaned after the Big Bang, has been discovered in the distant universe by astronomers using the world's most powerful optical telescope, the W. M. Keck Observatory on Maunakea, Hawaii.

Galactic Archaeology

The star Pristine 221.8781+9.7844 is one of the oldest stars in the Milky Way. We know this because of its atmosphere.

Researchers at the University of Bonn and the University of California at Irvine used sophisticated computer simulations to devise a test that could answer a burning question in astrophysics: is there really dark matter?

University of Groningen astronomers have discovered relics of merger events in the Milky Way halo.

The first stars in the universe blazed to life about 200 to 400 million years after the big bang.

Scientists reveal correlated flow of particles emerging from even the lowest-energy, small-scale collisions at Big-Bang particle collider.

How The Universe Became Filled With Light

Soon after the Big Bang, the universe went completely dark.

Astrophysicists have a fairly accurate understanding of how the universe ages.

Astronomers have just made a new measurement of the Hubble Constant, the rate at which the universe is expanding, and it doesn't quite line up with a different estimate of the same number.

Tracing The Cosmic Web

Galaxies in the universe trace patterns on very large scales; there are large empty regions (called "voids") and dense regions where the galaxies exist.

Download And 3-D Print Your Universe

Researchers have created a 3D printed cosmic microwave background - a map of the oldest light in the universe - and provided the files for download.

The universe suddenly looks a lot more crowded, thanks to a deep-sky census assembled from surveys taken by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope and other observatories.

Two papers published by an assistant professor at the University of California, Riverside and several collaborators explain why the universe has enough energy to become transparent.

An international team led by Japanese researchers has made a 3D map of 3000 galaxies 13 billion light years from Earth, and found that Einstein's general theory of relativity is still valid.

The Universe is constantly expanding. It changes, creating new structures that merge. But how does our Universe evolve?

In a new study, scientists from The University of Texas at Dallas and their colleagues suggest a novel way for probing the beginning of space and time, potentially revealing secrets about the conditions that gave rise to the universe.

What is the Universe Made Of?

Matter known as ordinary, which makes up everything we know, corresponds to only 5% of the Universe.

Researchers are sifting through an avalanche of data produced by one of the largest cosmological simulations ever performed, led by scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory.

Charting the Slow Death of the Universe

The study, which is part of the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) project, the largest multi-wavelength survey ever put together, involved many of the world's most powerful telescopes [1].

The Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) has been used to detect the most distant clouds of star-forming gas yet found in normal galaxies in the early Universe.

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