Results tagged “dust”

On Feb. 21, 2016 at 14:00 UTC, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured a true color image of Saharan dust over the Iberian Peninsula.

Hundreds of millions of tons of sand and dust particles are lifted from North African deserts each year and carried across the Atlantic Ocean. So much dust is kicked up that the microscopic particles amass into sweeping tan plumes that are visible to satellites.

The Sahara Desert and the Amazon rainforest seem to inhabit separate worlds.

A new study suggests that Saharan dust played a major role in the formation of the Bahamas islands.

NASA's Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer, or LADEE, observatory has been approved for a 28-day mission extension.

Dust Plumes Off of Namibia

Dust plumes blew off the coast of Namibia in early May 2013. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's Terra satellite captured this natural-color image on May 5, 2013. Parallel plumes blew toward the southwest, many of them coalescing into larger plumes over the Atlantic Ocean.

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