Results tagged “exoplanets”

The nearest exoplanets to us provide the best opportunities for detailed study, including searching for evidence of life outside the Solar System.

Observations made with the European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope (ESO's VLT) have revealed the telltale signs of a star system being born.

NASA's planet-hunting TESS Mission keeps giving astronomers new realities to examine and explain.

When Exoplanets Collide

A dramatic glimpse of the aftermath of a collision between two exoplanets is giving scientists a view of what can happen when planets crash into each other. A similar event in our own solar system may have formed the moon.

Using Earth's most powerful array of radio telescopes, astronomers have made the first observations of a circumplanetary disk of gas and dust like the one that is believed to have birthed the moons of Jupiter.

18 Earth-sized Exoplanets Discovered

Somewhat more than 4000 planets orbiting stars outside our solar system are known so far.

Researchers have spotted the formation sites of planets around a young star resembling our Sun.

Researchers have identified a young star with four Jupiter and Saturn-sized planets in orbit around it, the first time that so many massive planets have been detected in such a young system.

In this study, we investigated the differences between four commonly-used exoplanet catalogs (exoplanet.eu; exoplanetarchive.ipac.caltech.edu; openexoplanetcatalogue.com; exoplanets.org) using a Kolmogorov-Smirnov (KS) test.

Atmospheric characterization of directly imaged planets has thus far been limited to ground-based observations of young, self-luminous, Jovian planets.

New work from an international team of astronomers including Carnegie's Jaehan Bae used archival radio telescope data to develop a new method for finding very young extrasolar planets.

A University of Oklahoma astrophysics team has discovered for the first time a population of planets beyond the Milky Way galaxy.

When scientists searching for exoplanets -- worlds located beyond our solar system -- first spotted patterns in disks of dust and gas around young stars, they thought newly formed planets might be the cause.

In the search for planets similar to our own, an important point of comparison is the planet's density.

Modeling Weather on Hot Jupiters

The weather forecast for faraway, blistering planets called "hot Jupiters" might go something like this: Cloudy nights and sunny days, with a high of 2,400 degrees Fahrenheit (about 1,300 degrees Celsius, or 1,600 Kelvin).

NASA announced June 20, astronomers have discovered the youngest fully formed exoplanet ever detected.

Young stars much less massive than the Sun can unleash a torrent of X-ray radiation that can significantly shorten the lifetime of planet-forming disks surrounding these stars.

A survey of 10 hot, Jupiter-sized exoplanets conducted with NASA's Hubble and Spitzer space telescopes has led a team to solve a long-standing mystery -- why some of these worlds seem to have less water than expected.

A team of astronomers is proposing that huge spiral patterns seen around some newborn stars, merely a few million years old (about one percent our sun's age), may be evidence for the presence of giant unseen planets.

A recent and famous image from deep space marks the first time we've seen a forming planetary system, according to a study by U of T astrophysicists.

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