Results tagged “moon”

Building a Toolkit for the Moon

As the world celebrates 50 years since the first lunar landing, the team at ESA's astronaut centre is looking to the future of lunar exploration. This includes developing prototypes for rock and soil sampling equipment to be used on the Moon.

What Neil Armstrong Saw As He Landed

The only visual record of the historic Apollo 11 landing is from a 16mm time-lapse (6 frames per second) movie camera mounted in Buzz Aldrin's window (right side of Lunar Module Eagle or LM).

The moon is photographed in its first quarter phase just above the Earth's limb as the International Space Station orbited 255 miles above the Pacific Ocean south of the Hawaiian island chain.

On July 20, 1969, as Apollo astronaut Neil Armstrong climbed down the ladder from the "Eagle" lunar landing module, he found himself surrounded by a sea of grey -- an expanse of powdery dust no human had ever seen in person.

After months of being shy about how much it will cost to send Americans back to the lunar surface by 2024, NASA Administrator Bridenstine has finally started to get specific.

A mysterious large mass of material has been discovered beneath the largest crater in our solar system -- the Moon's South Pole-Aitken basin -- and may contain metal from the asteroid that crashed into the Moon and formed the crater, according to a Baylor University study.

Lux Aeterna At The Moon's South Pole

Close to the south pole, the Sun never rises far from the horizon, but as the Moon spins on its axis, the direction to the Sun changes.

For the first time, a cross-disciplinary study has shown chemical, physical, and material evidence for water formation on the Moon.

The stark difference between the Moon's heavily-cratered farside and the lower-lying open basins of the Earth-facing nearside has puzzled scientists for decades.

Magma Is The Key To The Moon's Makeup

For more than a century, scientists have squabbled over how the Earth's moon formed. But researchers at Yale and in Japan say they may have the answer.

Dust can be a nuisance -- on Earth and the Moon. Astronauts exploring the Moon's South Pole will need a way to help keep pesky lunar dust out of hard to reach places.

NASA is working right now to send American astronauts to the surface of the Moon in five years, and the agency has its sights set on a place no humans have ever gone before: the lunar South Pole.

Small amounts of water are attached to lunar grains on the dayside of the Moon and migrate around depending on surface temperature, as reported in a new paper by Planetary Science Institute Senior Scientist Amanda Hendrix.

NASA has selected 12 science and technology demonstration payloads to fly to the Moon as early as the end of this year, dependent upon the availability of commercial landers.

Administrator Jim Bridenstine kicked off an industry forum with remarks, followed by William Gerstenmaier, associate administrator for the Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate, who provided an overview of the agency's lunar human architecture solicitation requests.

How Open Is NASA's Open Lunar Architecture?

NASA held a media briefing session today at NASA HQ. The purpose of the briefing was to talk about the various lunar activities NASA is engaged in.

Earth's Oldest Rock Found on the Moon?

Scientists discover what may be Earth's oldest rock in a lunar sample returned by the Apollo 14 astronauts.

Using images and thermal data collected by NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO), Southwest Research Institute scientists and their collaborators have calculated the ages of large lunar craters across the Moon to be less than 1 billion years.

NASA has announced a call for Lunar Surface Instrument and Technology Payloads that will fly to the Moon on commercial lunar landers as early as next year or 2020.

Copernicus Crater's Central Peak

Copernicus (9.62°N, 339.92°E), which is easily seen with a moderately powerful backyard telescope, is one of the best-known craters on the Moon.

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