Results tagged “solar flare”

Satellites have detected powerful solar flares in the last two months, but this phenomenon has been recorded for over a century.

What began as a chat between husband and wife has evolved into an intriguing scientific discovery.

The sun emitted a significant solar flare, peaking at 7:24 p.m. EST on Dec. 19, 2014. NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, which watches the sun constantly, captured an image of the event.

The sun emitted a mid-level solar flare, an M6.6-class, peaking at 11:32 pm EDT on Oct. 28, 2014.

The sun emitted a significant solar flare on Oct. 19, 2014, peaking at 1:01 a.m. EDT.

Solar Explosions Inside a Computer

The shorter the interval between two explosions in the solar atmosphere, the more likely it is that the second flare will be stronger than the first one.

IRIS Footage of X-class Flare

On Sept. 10, 2014, NASA's newest solar observatory, the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph, or IRIS, mission joined other telescopes to witness an X-class flare - an example of one of the strongest solar flares -- on the sun.

Late Summer M5 Solar Flare

On Aug. 24, 2014, the sun emitted a mid-level solar flare, peaking at 8:16 a.m. EDT. NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory and STEREO captured images of the flare, which erupted on the left side of the sun.

Three X-class flares erupted from the left side of the sun June 10-11, 2014. These images are from NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory and show light in a blend of two ultraviolet wavelengths: 171 and 131 angstroms. The former is colorized in yellow; the latter, in red.

M1.3 Class Solar Flare

A class M1.3 flare can be observed from the Central-East active region on 3 June 2014 (~13 seconds into the movie), and a large prominence eruption followed by a spectacular expanding flare ribbon can be seen located to the South East, on 4 June 2014 (~33 sec into the movie). Note that on the Sun, East and West are reversed.

On March 29, 2014, an X-class flare erupted from the right side of the sun... and vaulted into history as the best-observed flare of all time.

In 2012, a rapid succession of coronal mass ejections - the most intense eruptions on the sun - sent a pulse of magnetized plasma barreling into space and through Earth's orbit.

NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory captures images of the sun in many wavelengths of light at the same time, each of which is typically colorized in a different color.

Sun Spits Out Mid-Level Solar Flare

The sun emitted a mid-level solar flare, beginning at 11:57 p.m. EST on Feb. 3, 2014, and peaking at midnight EST.

The sun emitted a significant solar flare, peaking at 5:12 p.m. EST on Nov. 5, 2013. Solar flares are powerful bursts of radiation. Harmful radiation from a flare cannot pass through Earth's atmosphere to physically affect humans on the ground, however -- when intense enough -- they can disturb the atmosphere in the layer where GPS and communications signals travel.

A Fiery Solar Explosion - The Sun as Art

Like a dragon breathing fire, a powerful blast of plasma erupts from the Sun in this colourised view of a 'coronal mass ejection'.

Solar Splashdown

On June 7, 2011, our Sun erupted, blasting tons of hot plasma into space. Some of that plasma splashed back down onto the Sun's surface, sparking bright flashes of ultraviolet light. This dramatic event may provide new insights into how young stars grow by sucking up nearby gas.

Here is a video fo today's beautiful arching prominence eruption on the north western limb of the Sun. One the prominence breaks, some of the plasma flows back to the solar surface, moving along the magnetic field lines. This view is in 304 angstroms wavelength of the extreme UV light.

The sun emitted a mid-level solar flare, peaking at 6:49 p.m. on June 7, 2013. Solar flares are powerful bursts of radiation. Harmful radiation from a flare cannot pass through Earth's atmosphere to physically affect humans on the ground, however -- when intense enough -- they can disturb the atmosphere in the layer where communications signals travel. This disrupts the radio signals for as long as the flare is ongoing, anywhere from minutes to hours.

First X-Class Solar Flares of 2013

On May 13, 2013, the sun emitted an X2.8-class flare, peaking at 12:05 p.m. EDT. This is the the strongest X-class flare of 2013 so far, surpassing in strength the X1.7-class flare that occurred 14 hours earlier. It is the 16th X-class flare of the current solar cycle and the third-largest flare of that cycle. The second-strongest was an X5.4 event on March 7, 2012. The strongest was an X6.9 on Aug. 9, 2011.

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