Results tagged “space medicine”

Question: Is long-duration exposure to weightlessness associated with impaired cerebral venous outflow and increased risk of jugular venous thrombosis?

Space Travel And Your Joints

A novel Henry Ford Hospital study of mice aboard a Russian spaceflight may raise an intriguing question for the astronauts of tomorrow: Could traveling in space be bad for your joints?

The Project Mercury astronauts were military test pilots on active duty who volunteered for these missions.

Before we can run or jump, we walk. Before sending humans to Mars, NASA must understand how the human body is affected by living and working in space.

Preliminary research results for the NASA Twins Study debuted at NASA's Human Research Program's annual Investigators' Workshop in Galveston, Texas the week of January 23.

Studying How Humans Respond To Space Travel

What happens to your body in space? NASA's Human Research Program has been unfolding answers for over a decade.

In 2011, a report from a National Academy of Sciences' decadal survey emphasized the need to examine and understand the influences that sex and gender have on physiological and psychological or behavioral changes that occur during spaceflight.

Once a year, Europe's experts in space medicine and astronaut medical support share their knowledge with future space medicine professionals during a week-long workshop at the European Astronaut Centre in Cologne, Germany.

New results from research on the International Space Station are offering clues on why astronauts' immune systems don't work as well in space. The findings may benefit the elderly on Earth.

New research in the FASEB Journal suggests that the 5-lipoxygenase enzyme mediates microgravity-induced lymphocyte programmed cell death and its inhibition could help astronauts and the elderly.

NASA Public Affairs Officer Josh Byerly interviews Ed Powers, NASA Flight Surgeon, about how flight doctors work with crew members, diagnosing astronauts in space from Earth and impacts to life here on Earth.

NASA Public Affairs Officer Kelly Humphries interviews Brian Crucian, NASA immunologist, about the issues with space flight and the immune system. Questions? Ask us on Twitter @NASA_Johnson and include the hashtag #askStation

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