Results tagged “supernova”

A supernova discovered by an international group of astronomers including Carnegie's Tom Holoien and Maria Drout, and led by University of Hawaii's Ben Shappee, provides an unprecedented look at the first moments of a violent stellar explosion.

Since it first appeared in the southern night sky on February 24th 1987, Supernova 1987A has been one of the most studied objects in the history of astronomy.

The slow fade of radioactive elements following a supernova allows astrophysicists to study them at length.

The moment a supernova becomes visible in the sky has been captured by an amateur astronomer, and has helped an international team of researchers validate theoretical predictions about the initial evolution of such stellar explosions.

Light from a supernova explosion in the nearby starburst galaxy M82 is reverberating off a huge dust cloud in interstellar space.

A Star That Would Not Die

Supernovae, the explosions of stars, have been observed by the thousands. And in all cases, the transient astronomical events signaled the death of those stars.

An international team of astronomers have created the longest consistent 3D model of a neutrino-driven supernova explosion to date, helping scientists to better understand the violent deaths of massive stars.

New work offers fresh evidence supporting the supernova shock wave theory of our solar system's origin.

The death of a massive star in a distant galaxy 10 billion years ago created a rare superluminous supernova that astronomers say is one of the most distant ever discovered.

Of all the varieties of exploding stars, the ones called Type Ia are perhaps the most intriguing.

30th Anniversary Image of Supernova 1987A

Three decades ago, a massive stellar explosion sent shockwaves not only through space but also through the astronomical community.

A research team led by University of Minnesota School of Physics and Astronomy Professor Yong-Zhong Qian uses new models and evidence from meteorites to show that a low-mass supernova triggered the formation of our solar system.

A new look at the debris from an exploded star in our galaxy has astronomers re-examining when the supernova actually happened.

Supernova DEM L316A As Seen By Hubble

This NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image captures the remnants of a long-dead star.

A team of astronomers led by The University of Texas at Austin's Howie Marion has detected a flash of light from the companion to an exploding star. This is the first time astronomers have witnessed the impact of an exploding star on its neighbor.

The brilliant flash of an exploding star's shockwavewhat astronomers call the "shock breakout"has been captured for the first time in the optical wavelength or visible light by NASA's planet-hunter, the Kepler space telescope.

Rare Supernova Impostor in a Nearby Galaxy

Breanna Binder, a University of Washington postdoctoral researcher in the Department of Astronomy and lecturer in the School of STEM at UW Bothell, spends her days pondering X-rays.

The Most Powerful Supernova Ever Seen

Right now, astronomers are viewing a ball of hot gas billions of light years away that is radiating the energy of hundreds of billions of suns. At its heart is an object a little larger than 10 miles across.

Scientists have been fascinated by a series of unusual exploding stars-outcasts beyond the typical cozy confines of their galaxies.

The chemical element lithium has been found for the first time in material ejected by a nova.

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