Results tagged “Antarctica”

Dale Andersen sent this message from: Lat -71.33293 Lon 13.45381 on 20 November 2017 5:22:14 AM EST: "Hi Keith: Looks like our weather is improving, but we still have strong gusting winds (25-30 knots and occasional 40 knot gusts) with blowing snow, but it is much nicer than yesterday so hopefully this afternoon and tomorrow it will settle down and we can get back to our field work.

Dale Andersen sent this message from: Lat -71.33293 Lon 13.45381 on 19 November 2017 at 1:43:18 AM EST: "The weather here is pretty bad with high winds gusting at 45-50 knots and a lot of blowing snow causing whiteout conditions here at the lake.

Dale Andersen sent this message via Iridium satphone on 14 November 2017 1:09:15 PM EST Hi Keith: We are settling in and our camp is fully operational - all the tents up, gear more or less sorted and science equipment has been opened and we are starting to work on the various tasks at hand.

Dale Andersen sent this message via Garmin in Reach from: Lat -71.332877 Lon 13.453317 on November 2017 at 11:39:37 AM EST. "Arrived. Untersee all ok". You can interact with the map here - note the viewing options in the upper right hand corner. Click on images for larger view.

Dale Andersen sent this message via Iridium satphone on 8 November 2017 at 2:54:15 AM EST: "Hi Keith: We are still at Novo waiting for the weather to improve long enough to begin the traverse to Lake Untersee. Unfortunately we have had a series of storms pass by dropping a fair amount of snow.

Dale Andersen sent this message via Iridium satphone on 5 November 2017 at 1:55:43 am EDT:

Dale Andersen sent this message via Garmin inRreach on 4 November 2017 at 8:44 am EDT from: Lat -70.774999 Lon 11.837554

A new study led by ANU has found that animals and plants may live in warm caves under Antarctica's glaciers.

UNSW Sydney scientists studying microbes from some of the saltiest lakes in Antarctica have discovered a new way that the tiny organisms can share DNA that could help them grow and survive.

Microbial Mats Adapting to the Cold

Researchers have identified the first cold-adaptation proteins found in microbial mats from Lake Joyce, a perennially ice-covered lake in Antarctica.

At the bottom of an icy Antarctic lake, a thin, slimy layer of bright green microbes is generating a tiny oasis of oxygen that might give a picture of what early Earth looked like before oxygen became common in the atmosphere.

Nearing the Limits of Life on Earth

It took Jackie Goordial over 1000 Petri dishes before she was ready to accept what she was seeing.

At the bottom of a frigid Antarctic lake, a thin layer of green slime is generating a little oasis of oxygen, a team including UC Davis researchers has found.

Many view Antarctica as a frozen wasteland. Turns out there are hidden interconnected lakes underneath its dry valleys that could sustain life and shed light on ancient climate change.

Where Ice sheet, Ocean and Land Converge

Using a specially designed hot-water drill to cleanly bore through a half mile of ice, a National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded team of researchers has become the first ever to reach and sample the "grounding zone," where Antarctic ice, land and sea all converge.

A National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded research team has successfully tested an autonomous underwater vehicle, AUV, that can produce high-resolution, three-dimensional maps of Antarctic sea ice.

On The Road to Lake Untersee: We are completely packed up now, using the Everest tracked vehicle, pulling two sleds behind it.

The team is on the ice, having arrived ok at Novolazarevskaya Station yesterday afternoon.

Researchers this week published a paper confirming that the waters and sediments of a lake that lies 800 meters (2,600 feet) beneath the surface of the West Antarctic ice sheet support "viable microbial ecosystems."

Microbiologist Jill Mikucki first saw a photo of Blood Falls during a class for her master's degree at Portland State University. It immediately captivated her.

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