Results tagged “Cassini”

Saturn's Southern Hemisphere

Winter is approaching in the southern hemisphere of Saturn and with this cold season has come the familiar blue hue that was present in the northern winter hemisphere at the start of NASA's Cassini mission.

The Yin and Yang Appearance of Iapetus

Iapetus is a moon of extreme contrasts. The light and dark features give the moon a distinctive "yin and yang" appearance.

Cassini is providing scientists with key clues about Saturn's moon Titan, and in particular, its hydrocarbon lakes and seas.

NASA has released a natural-color image of Saturn from space, the first in which Saturn, its moons and rings, and Earth, Venus and Mars, all are visible.

Quintet of Saturn's Moons

This view, from 29 July 2011, looks toward the northern, sunlit side of the rings from just above the ringplane.

New Views of Titan's Land of Lakes

With the sun now shining down over the north pole of Saturn's moon Titan, a little luck with the weather, and trajectories that put the spacecraft into optimal viewing positions, NASA's Cassini spacecraft has obtained new pictures of the liquid methane and ethane seas and lakes that reside near Titan's north pole.

The NASA-ESA-ASI Cassini spacecraft has been observing the Saturn system, including the giant satellite Titan, for more than 9 years. A detailed analysis of Cassini data has now confirmed predictions that the density of Titan's ionosphere is directly linked to the 11 year cycle of solar activity.

Attached to the Harmony node, the first Cygnus commercial cargo spacecraft built by Orbital Sciences Corp., in the grasp of the Canadarm2, is photographed by an Expedition 37 crew member on the International Space Station.

Stunning View From High Above Saturn

This portrait looking down on Saturn and its rings was created from images obtained by NASA's Cassini spacecraft on Oct. 10, 2013.

Arc Across the Planet Saturn

Saturn's rings appear to form a majestic arc over the planet in this image from NASA's Cassini spacecraft.

A Fresh Look at Northern Lakes on Titan

During closest approach of this Titan flyby, Cassini's visible and infrared mapping spectrometer (VIMS) instrument will, for the first time, acquire images of Punga Mare.

A monster storm that erupted on Saturn in late 2010 - as large as any storm ever observed on the ringed planet -- has already impressed researchers with its intensity and long-lived turbulence.

People around the world shared more than 1,400 images of themselves as part of the Wave at Saturn event organized by NASA's Cassini mission on July 19 -- the day the Cassini spacecraft turned back toward Earth to take our picture.

Saturn's Epimetheus, Going Rogue?

Although Epimetheus appears to be orbiting between the A and F rings in this image, it's just an illusion! Epimetheus, which orbits Saturn well outside of the F ring's orbit, is actually on the near side of Saturn to Cassini while the rings seen here are on the far side of the planet. Whew, that's a relief!

Color and black-and-white images of Earth taken by two NASA interplanetary spacecraft July 19 show our planet and its moon as bright beacons from millions of miles away in space.

Mimas and Pandora remind us of how different they are when they appear together as in this Cassini spacecraft image. Although they are both moons of Saturn, Pandora's small size means that it lacks sufficient gravity to pull itself into a round shape like its larger sibling, Mimas.

NASA's Cassini spacecraft, now exploring Saturn, took a picture of our home planet from a distance of hundreds of millions of miles on July 19. NASA invited the public to help acknowledge the historic interplanetary portrait as it is being taken. This is the video of that event.

Saturn: Halfway to Southern Winter

The shadows of Saturn's rings edge ever farther southward as Saturn creeps towards southern winter (or northern summer). Saturn is now almost exactly halfway between its equinox (August 2009) and southern winter solstice (in May 2017).

Scientists have confirmed the presence of PAHs - Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons - in the upper atmosphere of Saturn's largest moon, Titan. The study, based on data from the VIMS instrument on the Cassini orbiter, provides an explanation of the origin of the aerosol particles found in the lowest haze layer that blankets Titan's surface. The PAHs, which form high up in the atmosphere, later grow into larger aggregates that drift down - much like snow flakes - and eventually give rise to aerosols.

Hints of Activity on Dione

From a distance, most of the Saturnian moon Dione resembles a bland cue ball. Thanks to close-up images of a 500-mile-long (800-kilometer-long) mountain on the moon from NASA's Cassini spacecraft, scientists have found more evidence for the idea that Dione was likely active in the past. It could still be active now.

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