Results tagged “Dark Matter”

Fresh Theories About Dark Matter

Tom Broadhurst, the Ikerbasque researcher in the Department of Theoretical Physics of the UPV/EHU, together with Sandor Molnar of the National Taiwan University and visiting Ikerbasque researcher at the UPV/EHU in 2013, have conducted a simulation that explains the collision between two clusters of galaxies.

Using the MUSE instrument on ESO's VLT in Chile, along with images from Hubble in orbit, a team of astronomers studied the simultaneous collision of four galaxies in the galaxy cluster Abell 3827.

Scientists on the Dark Energy Survey have released the first in a series of dark matter maps of the cosmos.

Astronomers using observations from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope and NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory have studied how dark matter in clusters of galaxies behaves when the clusters collide.

Dark Matter at the Heart of Our Galaxy

The ubiquitous presence of dark matter in the universe is today a central tenet in modern cosmology and astrophysics.

Space scientists at the University of Leicester have detected a curious signal in the X-ray sky -- one that provides a tantalizing insight into the nature of mysterious 'dark matter.'

Scientists believe they have found a way to explain why there are not as many galaxies orbiting the Milky Way as expected.

An update from the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics provides a possible lead in the hunt for Dark Matter.

HADES Searches for Dark Matter

Although Dark Energy and Dark Matter appear to constitute over 95 percent of the universe, nobody knows of which particles they are made up.

NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has uncovered the largest known population of globular star clusters, an estimated 160,000, swarming like bees inside the crowded core of the giant grouping of galaxies known as Abell 1689.

Scientists will need further analysis to discern whether dark matter caused any of the COUPP-60 experiment's first bubbles.

An international collaboration whose search for dark matter is powered by detectors being fabricated at Texas A&M University has for the first time observed a concrete hint of what physicists believe to be the particle behind dark matter and therefore nearly a quarter of the universe -- a WIMP, or weakly interacting massive particle.

An advanced particle detector onboard the International Space Station may have recorded its first whiff of Dark Matter. Researchers are excited about the possibility of finally understanding what this mysterious substance is made of.

AMS-02: Shining Light on Dark Matter

The antimatter hunter AMS-02 on the International Space Station is searching for the missing pieces of our Universe. The project's first results published today are hinting at a new phenomenon and revealing more about the invisible 'dark matter'.

Dark Matter Halos May Contain Stars

Could it be that dark matter "halos" -- the huge, invisible cocoons of mass that envelop entire galaxies and account for most of the matter in the universe -- aren't completely dark after all but contain a small number of stars?

Astronomers using the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope have studied a giant filament of dark matter in 3D for the first time. Extending 60 million light-years from one of the most massive galaxy clusters known, the filament is part of the cosmic web that constitutes the large-scale structure of the universe, and is a leftover of the very first moments after the Big Bang

Plenty of Dark Matter Near the Sun

Astronomers at the University of Zuerich, the ETH Zurich, the University of Leicester and NAOC Beijing have found large amounts of invisible "dark matter" near the Sun.

AMS Experiment Marks 1 Year in Space

CERN today marked the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer's first year in space with a visit from the crew of the shuttle mission, STS-134, that successfully delivered AMS to the International Space Station just over a year ago.

Scientists have, for the first time, directly detected part of the invisible dark matter skeleton of the universe, where more than half of all matter is believed to reside.

There's more to the cosmos than meets the eye. About 80 percent of the matter in the universe is invisible to telescopes, yet its gravitational influence is manifest in the orbital speeds of stars around galaxies and in the motions of clusters of galaxies.

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