Results tagged “ISS”

Video: Hacking Kinect - NASA Applications?

Think for a moment: Remember all of the things in "Avatar", "Star Trek", and other SciFi films that were controlled by people waving their hands over sexy looking devices, wandering around holodecks, or using remotely controlled bodies. When Kinect was first released, Microsoft was against anyone hacking it. A similar thing happened when LEGO Mindstorms was released and hobbyists began to fiddle with the software. As was the case with LEGO, Microsoft has done a complete 180 and has overtly embraced the notion that people can take technology and do things that its originators never imagined. How could Kinect hacks change the way that NASA does things? What would it be like to use Kinect as a whole body interface with 360 degrees of movement while living in microgravity aboard the ISS? Could NASA control Robonaut this way?

Another Student Payload on the ISS

American Society for Gravitational and Space Biology Student Experiment to Fly as Nanoracks Payload on the ISS

"The American Society for Gravitational and Space Biology (ASGSB), a U.S. non-profit 501(C)(6) scientific society, announces today an agreement has been signed with Nanoracks (Houston, Texas) to fly a student space >light experiment on-board the NASA International Space Station (ISS). NanoRacks is an industry leader in low-earth orbit space services http://nanoracks.com/. NanoRacks, LLC is working with NASA under a Space Act Agreement for the use of the U.S. National Lab. ASGSB has entered into an agreement with NanoRacks as a result of an industry partnership agreement with the Science and Technology Corporation (STC). STC is a small, high-technology company that has experience in nano-satellite and space instrument development."

Novel ISS Outreach Ideas Sought

NASA Seeks Hosts for Space Station Interactive Education Events

"NASA is seeking proposals from educators who are looking for a unique way to inspire the next generation of explorers. Formal and informal education organizations can apply to host live interactive education downlinks with astronauts onboard the International Space Station. During Expeditions 31 and 32, NASA crew members Don Pettit, Joseph Acaba and Sunita Williams will participate in the 20-minute downlink opportunities. Participants on Earth see and hear the crew members live from space, while the crew hears the questions but does not see the audience."

YouTube SpaceLab Announced

YouTube SpaceLab Lifts Off With Lenovo Aboard

"Six regional finalists will gather in Washington, D.C., in March 2012 to experience a ZERO-G flight and receive other prizes. From them, two global winners, one from each age group, will be announced and later have their experiments performed 250 miles above Earth and live streamed on YouTube. Additionally, the global winners will get to choose a unique space experience as a prize: either a trip to Tanegashima Island, Japan, to watch their experiment blast off in a rocket bound for the ISS, or once they are 18 years old, a one-of-a-kind astronaut training experience in Star City, Russia, the training center for Russian cosmonauts."

NASA Announcement of Mission of Opportunity for Secondary Payload on EcAMSat NanoSatellite Flight Opportunity

"The International Space Station Utilization Office currently has 2U Mission of opportunity payload capacity available on the EcAMSat launch mission planned for Summer of 2012. This launch opportunity will be open to all Ames individuals or groups with technology that meets the interface requirements as described in the attached file and will be ready for integration by the project March 21, 2012, CDR date."

ISS-Notify - The Space Station Light, Kickstarter

"Human space flight is an awesome part of living in the future. But why does it still seem so abstract? There are people in space right now! Did you know that? Do you know how many there are? ISS-Notify is a simple attempt at making our space program more real. Many times a day the international space station passes overhead unnoticed. Often it happens during the day when it's too bright to see the tiny dot in the sky. So this light will pulse and shine whenever the station is overhead -- making the invisible visible. This started as a simple weekend project because I thought it would be cool. I finished it in only 4 days! The response has been overwhelming. Everyone says "I want one"! I've heard from space geeks, teachers, NASA employees, and just about everyone in between."

Keith's note: An interesting new website International Space Station Live!, hosted at JSC, is now online. It displays a variety of telemetry and data feeds from the ISS. Much of the data is realtime or close to real time and will offer people a chance to look over the shoulders of the people operating - and working aboard - the ISS.

Keith's note: In the very near future NASA, Google, and computer manufacturer Lenovo are set to announce an interesting educational project. As I understand the gist of the effort from various sources, students will be asked to come up with ideas for experiments that can be performed on the ISS and submit a video via YouTube that describes their idea. Winners will be selected and the experiments described in the videos will actually be performed aboard the ISS. This is an interesting way to get novel ideas onboard the ISS - and possibly to spark careers. Moreover, it is a way to show that the ISS has utility beyond the experiments proposed by a small cadre of insiders.

University Research on the ISS

PSU in Space: Experiments underway on the International Space Station

"The goal of this series of experiments is to test how fluid in specially shaped conduits behaves in zero gravity. The scientists on Earth - at PSU and at the University of Bremen - are manipulating the fluid movement to see at what point bubbles form. Formation of bubbles decreases fuel efficiency, and is particular to zero-gravity situations. Fuel tanks on spacecraft are designed in a way that minimizes this occurrence, but these experiments may shed light on how tanks might be designed smaller - a logistical advantage in sending any kind of craft into space, according to Bob Green, one of the NASA scientists working temporarily at PSU."

On April 2, Skvortsov, Kornienko, and Caldwell Dyson will launch to the station aboard a Russian Soyuz spacecraft. They will dock to the space station on April 4, joining Russian cosmonaut Oleg Kotov, NASA astronaut T.J. Creamer and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) astronaut Soichi Noguchi, who arrived on the station in December as part of Expedition 22.

Space shuttle Endeavour rolls from the Vehicle Assembly Building to Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, beginning the final phase of preparations before the upcoming STS-130 mission.

NASA TV coverage of Mondays news conference in Houston updating Expedition 22 aboard the International Space Station.

JAXA Astronaut Discusses Life in Space

International Space Station Flight Engineer Soichi Noguchi of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency discussed his life aboard the orbiting laboratory with Japanese Prime Minister Yukio Hatoyama during an in-flight event on Jan. 7.

Space shuttle Endeavour was moved Jan. 6 from the Vehicle Assembly Building to Launch Pad 39A at NASAs Kennedy Space Center in Florida for its STS-130 mission to the International Space Station. The move is referred to as a "rollout."

Endeavour is targeted to launch Feb. 7. During its 13-day mission, the shuttles six astronauts will deliver a third connecting module, the Tranquility node, to the space station.

Aboard the International Space Station, three members of the Expedition 22 crew, Commander Jeff Williams, Flight Engineer T.J. Creamer, and Flight Engineer
Soichi Noguchi participated in an in-flight educational event on Jan. 6, 2009. The crew spoke with the Winter School in Winter, Wisconsin and the Lac Courte Orielles Ojibwe School in Hayward, Wisconsin.

About ninety minutes after docking with the Zarya module, astronauts aboard the Soyuz capsule opened the hatch into the International Space Station. Soyuz Commander Oleg Kotov and Flight Engineers T.J. Creamer of NASA and Soichi Noguchi of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency were greeted by Expedition 22 Commander Jeff Williams of NASA and Russian Flight Engineer Maxim Suraev.

NASA - Expedition 22 Soyuz Docking

Expedition 22 Soyuz Commander Oleg Kotov and Flight Engineers T.J. Creamer of NASA and Soichi Noguchi of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency arrived at the International Space Station Dec. 23, 2009. They docked to the Zarya module to begin six months on the complex.

After leaving the International Space Station at 10:56 p.m. EST Monday the Soyuz landed upright in Kazakhstan at 2:15 a.m. On board and extracted where Canadian Space Agency Flight Engineer Robert Thirsk, Expedition 21 Flight Engineer and Soyuz Commander Roman Romanenko and European Space Agency Flight Engineer Frank De Winne.

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