Results tagged “Saturn”

Navigating the Seas of Titan

Humanity has landed a rover on Mars. Now, say scientists, it's time to land a boat on Titan. This outlandish scenario could become reality, according to engineers presenting their proposals at the European Planetary Science Congress on 27 September.

River Networks on Titan

For many years, Titan's thick, methane- and nitrogen-rich atmosphere kept astronomers from seeing what lies beneath. Saturn's largest moon appeared through telescopes as a hazy orange orb, in contrast to other heavily cratered moons in the solar system.

Winter Is Coming on Titan

False-color images from NASA's Cassini spacecraft show the development of a hood of high-altitude haze - which appears orange in this image -- forming over the south pole of Saturn's moon Titan.

Vortex Seen at Titan's South Pole

Images from NASA's Cassini spacecraft show a concentration of high-altitude haze and a vortex materializing at the south pole of Saturn's moon Titan, signs that the seasons are turning on Saturn's largest moon.

Subsurface Ocean on Titan

Data from NASA's Cassini spacecraft have revealed Saturn's moon Titan likely harbors a layer of liquid water under its ice shell.

Jet Streams Cross-Cut Saturn

Turbulent jet streams, regions where winds blow faster than in other places, churn east and west across Saturn. Scientists have been trying to understand for years the mechanism that drives these wavy structures in Saturn's atmosphere and the source from which the jets derive their energy.

Saturn's Rings and Ring Shadows

This image was taken on June 19, 2012 and received on Earth June 20, 2012. The camera was pointing toward Saturn at approximately 1,706,861 miles (2,746,927 kilometers) away, and the image was taken using the CB2 and CL2 filters.

Tropical Methane Lakes on Titan

NASA's Cassini spacecraft has spied long-standing methane lakes, or puddles, in the "tropics" of Saturn's moon Titan. One of the tropical lakes appears to be about half the size of Utah's Great Salt Lake, with a depth of at least 3 feet (1 meter).

Recent findings from NASA's Cassini mission reveal that Saturn's geyser moon Enceladus provides a special laboratory for watching unusual behavior of plasma, or hot ionized gas. In these recent findings, some Cassini scientists think they have observed "dusty plasma," a condition theorized but not previously observed on site, near Enceladus.

Saturn's moons Daphnis and Pan demonstrate their effects on the planet's rings in this view from the Cassini spacecraft.

Spectacular Image: Titan and Saturn

This image was taken on May 06, 2012 and received on Earth May 07, 2012. The camera was pointing toward Titan at approximately 475,131 miles (764,649 kilometers) away.

Data from NASA's Cassini mission reveal Saturn's moon Phoebe has more planet-like qualities than previously thought.

Saturn's giant moon Titan hides within a thick, smoggy atmosphere that's well-known to scientists as one of the most complex chemical environments in the solar system. It's a productive "factory" cranking out hydrocarbons that rain down on Titan's icy surface, cloaking it in soot and, with a brutally cold surface temperature of around minus 270 degrees Fahrenheit, forming lakes of liquid methane and ethane.

This Week's Photo of Titan

This image was taken on April 08, 2012 and received on Earth April 09, 2012. The camera was pointing toward Titan at approximately 1,810,102 kilometers away, and the image was taken using the CL1 and CB3 filters. This image has not been validated or calibrated.

Exosphere Confirmed at Saturn's Moon Dione

The Cassini spacecraft flew by Dione, one of Saturn's icy moons, on 7 April 2010. During that flyby, instruments detected molecular oxygen ions around the moon. Tokar et al. used those measurements to estimate the density of the molecular oxygen ions to be in the range of 0.01 to 0.09 ions per cubic centimeter (or ions per 0.06 cubic inch). These molecular oxygen ions are produced when neutral molecules are ionized; the measurements confirm that a neutral exosphere surrounds Dione.

Image: Saturn and Dione

Saturn and Dione appear askew in this Cassini spacecraft view, with the north poles rotated to the right, as if they were threaded along on the thin diagonal line of the planet's rings.

Cassini Flyby of Enceladus

On Monday, Nov. 2, NASA's Cassini spacecraft will take its deepest dive yet through the plumes of Saturns moon Enceladus. The goal is to learn more about the composition and density of the plumes spewing from the moons south pole. This is the seventh targeted flyby of Enceladus, so we sometimes refer to it as E7. The video has no sound.

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