Results tagged “Space Weather”

The Impact of the Solar Wind

From our vantage point on the ground, the sun seems like a still ball of light, but in reality, it teems with activity.

The New Horizons spacecraft sent back over three years worth of measurements of the solar wind the constant flow of solar particles that the sun flings out into space from a region that has been visited by only a few spacecraft.

Space weather scientist Liz MacDonald has seen auroras more than five times in her life, but it was the aurora she didn't see that affected her the most.

On March 9, 1989, a huge cloud of solar material exploded from the sun, twisting toward Earth.

The geomagnetic storming watch for 30 December has been upgraded to a G3 (Strong), with a G1 (Minor) storming watch still in effect for 31 December.

A Mechanism That halts Solar Eruptions

Among the most feared events in space physics are solar eruptions, massive explosions that hurl millions of tons of plasma gas and radiation into space.

Video: Simulating Space Weather at Pluto

This video shows a simulation of the space environment all the way out to Pluto in the months surrounding New Horizons' July 2015 flyby.

For scientists studying the impacts of space weather, one of the central mysteries of solar flares.

The Sun demonstrates the potential to superflare, new research into stellar flaring suggests.

This winter, two sounding rockets will launch through the aurora borealis over Norway to study how particles move in a region near the North Pole where Earth's magnetic field is directly connected to the solar wind.

New research led by physicists at the University of Warwick has used tools designed to study social networks to gain significant new insights into the Northern Lights, and space weather particularly the interaction of events in the sun's atmosphere with Earth's ionosphere.

Images of a Mid-level Solar Flare Today

The sun emitted a mid-level solar flare, peaking at 3:33 a.m EDT on Aug. 24, 2015.

The universe overflows with repeating patterns. From the smallest cells to the largest galaxies, scientists are often rewarded by observing similar patterns in vastly different places.

NuSTAR Views The X-ray Sun

X-rays light up the surface of our Sun in a bouquet of colors in this new image containing data from NASA's Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array, or NuSTAR.

Sun Unleashes Mid-level Flare

The sun emitted a mid-level solar flare, peaking at 2:23 p.m. EDT on June 22, 2015. NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, which watches the sun constantly, captured an image of the event. Solar flares are powerful bursts of radiation.

What began as a chat between husband and wife has evolved into an intriguing scientific discovery.

Our sun is a volatile star: explosions of light, energy and solar materials regularly dot its surface.

While no one yet knows what's needed to build a habitable planet, it's clear that the interplay between the sun and Earth is crucial for making our planet livable - a balance between a sun that provides energy and a planet that can protect itself from the harshest solar emissions.

Protecting Earth From Bad Space Weather

This week's spectacular glowing auroras in the night sky further south than usual highlighted the effect that 'space weather' can have on Earth.

SDO Collects Its 100-Millionth Image

On Jan. 19, 2015, at 12:49 p.m. EST, an instrument on NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory captured its 100 millionth image of the sun.

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