Results tagged “extrasolar”

What Kinds of Stars Form Rocky Planets?

As astronomers continue to find more and more planets around stars beyond our own Sun, they are trying to discover patterns and features that indicate what types of planets are likely to form around different kinds of stars.

A planet discovered last year sitting at an unusually large distance from its star -- 16 times farther than Pluto is from the Sun -- may have been kicked out of its birthplace close to the star in a process similar to what may have happened early in our own solar system's history.

First Image of A Planet Forming

There are 450 light-years between Earth and LkCa15, a young star with a transition disk around it, a cosmic whirling dervish, a birthplace for planets.

An Extrasolar Planet With 5,400 MPH Winds

Winds of over 2 km per second have been discovered flowing around planet outside of the Earth's solar system, new research has found.

Weather patterns in a mysterious world beyond our solar system have been revealed for the first time, a study suggests.

Most Earth-Like Worlds Have Yet to Be Born

Earth came early to the party in the evolving universe

An accidental find of a collection of young red dwarf stars close to our solar system could give us a rare glimpse of slow-motion planet formation.

A planet 100 light-years away that resembles a young Jupiter has been discovered by an international team of astronomers that includes six UCLA scientists.

Although people have been naming celestial objects for millennia, the International Astronomical Union (IAU) is the authority responsible for assigning official names to celestial bodies.

A New Planet Orbiting Two Stars

A team of astronomers including a San Francisco State University researcher has discovered a new planet orbiting a pair of stars, the 10th "circumbinary" planet discovered by NASA's Kepler Mission and a milestone for the 6-year-old spacecraft.

Using NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope, astronomers have confirmed the discovery of the nearest rocky planet outside our solar system, larger than Earth and a potential gold mine of science data.

Scientists analyzing four years of data from NASA's Kepler mission have released a new catalog of exoplanet candidates.

Sibling suns -- made famous in the "Star Wars" scene where Luke Skywalker gazes toward a double sunset -- and the planets around them may be more common than we've thought, and Cornell University astronomers are presenting new ideas on how to find them.

So far, exoplanet surveys have been most sensitive to planetary systems that are populated in their inner regions by massive planets, down to a few times the mass of the Earth

Earth-like planets orbiting other stars in the Milky Way are three times more likely to have the same type of minerals as Earth than astronomers had previously thought.

Pebbles Poised to Make Planets

A team of astronomers led from St. Andrews and Manchester universities today (6 July) announced the discovery of a ring of rocks circling a very young star.

Observing the Birth of a Planet

Observing time at the European Southern Observatory (ESO) on Paranal Mountain is a very precious commodity.

New work from Carnegie's Alan Boss offers a potential solution to a longstanding problem in the prevailing theory of how rocky planets formed in our own solar system, as well as in others.

For a planet, this would be like a day at the spa. After years of growing old, a massive planet could, in theory, brighten up with a radiant, youthful glow.

Astronomers from Leiden University and the University of Arizona have successfully commissioned a new type of optic that can reveal the image of an exoplanet next to its parent star.

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